Screens are Everywhere: How to Integrate Screen Time into our Daily Lives Without Sacrificing Physical Activity

Screens are Everywhere: How to Integrate Screen Time into our Daily Lives Without Sacrificing Physical Activity Title Slide

The majority of children and youth are not engaging in enough heart pumping physical activity for good health. At the same time, many of these children and youth are accumulating excessive amounts of time engaging in sedentary behaviours, especially screen time. This puts them at risk for a myriad of chronic health conditions both immediately, and later in life. Unfortunately, the solution to this issue is not evident, and health researchers continue to work to promote healthy active living among children of all ages. Recent Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines suggest that we take a whole day approach, that the combination of various bahaviours is more important than any individual behavior in isolation. The sum is more important than the parts. Children and youth must step, sweat, sleep, and sit throughout the day for good health. This webinar focuses on the sweat and sit – time spent engaging in moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity, and in sedentary behavior. Within sedentary behavior, the focus is on screen time. This webinar presents a thorough summary of the current research landscape as it relates to physical activity and screen time; recommendations for key messages related to physical activity and screen time; and provide an overview of some interventions aimed at increasing physical activity.

By the end of this webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Understand the relationship between physical activity and screen time.
  • Become familiar with interventions and strategies to reduce screen time and increase physical activity.
  • Appreciate how to adopt safe screen habits in the school, community, and home environment.

Presenter: Dr. Allana LeBlanc, CIHR Health Systems Impact Fellow, University of Ottawa Heart Institute. She completed her PhD in Population Health at the University of Ottawa, her masters (MSc) in the School of Kinesiology and Health Studies at Queen’s University, and her undergraduate degree (BScH) in the Department of Biology at Acadia University. Dr. LeBlanc is a Certified Exercise Physiologist with the Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology, has Level 2 certification with Exercise is Medicine Canada, is a Certified Clinical Exercise Physiologist with the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), and a Physical Activity in Public Health Specialist with the ACSM/National Physical Activity Society. Over her short research career she has published over 45 articles, an h-index of 20, and over 5600 citations.

To read the blog recap on this webinar, go to parc.ophea.net/blog.